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BAGDAD VILLAGE HISTORIC DISTRICT

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES    -    SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FL 

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Snoddy - Allen House  -  6876 Main St

 

BAGDAD LAND & LUMBER COMPANY ERA, 1923 - 1945

The Snoddy - Allen House is a Frame Vernacular style built in the last era of Bagdad's lumber mill.  During this time, more homes for company superintendents were built along Main St. as the Village expanded.  This one was built for Mr. Snoddy and illustrates the continued adaptation in building design.  It features a hip roof with a gable detail above the porch.  The decorative brackets and double columns complement the wide steps, balancing the overall design.  

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Work - Davis House  -  6860 Main St

 

BAGDAD LAND & LUMBER COMPANY ERA, 1923 - 1945

This side-gabled Bungalow style home was built by the Bagdad Land & Lumber Company for the mill superintendent E. C. Work.  Details that define a typical Bungalow are low pitched roof lines with wide overhanging eaves, encircling porches, and bands of windows.  Second floors were usually incorporated under the main roof and used dormers to break the plane.  Both single-stories and two-stories were built in Bagdad when the style was introduced.  The Work - Davis House is a two-story with wide overhanging eaves and an upper dormer banded with windows.  Its grand porch is set under a low-pitched roof with recessed areas for seating.

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(Above) The Work - Davis House is a two-story Bungalow style home with wide overhanging eaves and an upper dormer banded with windows. Its grand porch is set under a low-pitched roof with recessed areas for seating. 

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Work - Ellis  House  -  6856 Main St

 

BAGDAD LAND & LUMBER COMPANY ERA, 1923 - 1945

This Frame Vernacular style house was built about 1925 and served as a rental unit for the Work family next door.  Mr. Work was the mill superintendent for the Bagdad Land & Lumber Company.  The home is another illustration of combined elements that create a visually appealing home.  The high-pitched roof balances the narrow front face of the house creating an inviting front entry.  Without the side-wing, which may have been a later addition, the style is reminiscent of a Shotgun house, a sub-type of Frame Vernacular popular during this era. 

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Humphrey - Carter House  -  6847 Main St

 

STEARNS & CULVER COMPANY ERA, 1903 - 1923

This house is an outstanding example of Dutch Colonial Revival construction, a style rarely seen in Northwest Florida.  It was built before 1913 by the Stearns & Culver Company and became the home of Dr. C. W. Humphrey, Presbyterian minister for Bagdad and Milton.  The house is a two and one-half story structure surmounted by a massive cross-gambrel roof.  In the early 1900s, the house was widely known for its large gardens and fruit orchard.  

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Henderson - Watson House  -  6865 Main St

 

BAGDAD LAND & LUMBER COMPANY ERA, 1923 - 1945

The Henderson - Watson House is another example of the Bungalow style built during this era. The one-story is designed with low-pitched roofs, wide overhanging eaves, and is accented with bold corbels.  The wrap-around porch is set deep under the roof line, and features both front and side steps.  

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Bagdad Inn Kitchen - Davis Cottage  -  6873 Main St

 

STEARNS & CULVER COMPANY ERA, 1903 - 1923

This cottage once served as the kitchen to the Bagdad Inn.  The Inn was built in 1913 and formally opened its doors on the eve of September 22 with a grand celebration.  It was considered a fine hotel serving excellent cuisine, and catering to both family and  transient  patronage.   The  Bagdad  Inn,  along with the other businesses in the Village, prospered indirectly from Bagdad's lumber and shipping industries until the mill closed its doors in 1939.  The main building was demolished in 1941, with only the kitchen to remain.  It was converted to an apartment that same year by Leo Davis Sr. and his wife where extended family would reside.  

The Bagdad Inn was a fine hotel that opened in September of 1913.  The hotel entertained dignitaries from all over the world who traveled to the Bagdad’s lumber mill for business.  This building was located in Bagdad, FL, Santa Rosa County.

(Above)  The Bagdad Inn was located on the corner of Church St and Main St.  It opened in 1913, entertaining dignitaries from all over the world who traveled to the mill for business.

This Frame Vernacular Style antebellum house was owned by James Edwin and Ella B. Creary. Creary was one of six partners in the E. E. Simpson Company. The home is adorned with ornamental porch brackets and a porte-cochere.  This home is located in Bagdad, FL, Santa Rosa County.

Creary House  -  6872 Henderson Drive

 

E. E. SIMPSON ERA, 1855 -1866

The Creary House is one of two antebellum homes that survived the Civil War era and is among the oldest in the Village of Bagdad.  Dating back to the mid-1800s, the Creary House is a Frame Vernacular style home that was owned by James Edwin Creary and his wife, Ella.  Creary was one of six partners in the E. E. Simpson Company.  In 1927, ownership transferred to James D. Henderson who served as president of the Bagdad Land and Lumber Company.  At one time, the house had been divided into six apartments.  After sitting vacant for about 15 years, the house was restored to its original state.  The gable-roofed home features a two-story porch and a porte-cochere.   The lower porch extends around the side and is adorned with ornamental brackets. 

 
 
 
 

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